The following plan ensures the safety of staff, students, and families as Catholic schools continue in-person for the 2021-22 school year during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Click here to read the “Archdiocese of Louisville Catholic Elementary Schools Re-Entry Plan for 2021-22.”

 

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Technology

Technology is an integral part of the Catholic School curriculum. We foster the excellence that flows from the ability to use today’s information, tools, and technologies effectively and with a commitment to life-long learning—all necessary to be active, creative, knowledgeable, and ethical participants in our global society.

Students in Archdiocese of Louisville Catholic Schools are truly 21st-century learners using the latest technologies to frame their learning and cultivate critical and creative problem-solving skills. Covid-19 restrictions accelerated the move to one device per student and the need for students to have devices at home and school for collaborative learning. Teachers have integrated technology at an unprecedented rate to manage the needs of students while supporting a robust curriculum. The innovative use of technology extends learning beyond the classroom. Virtual reality and augmented reality transport students to ancient Rome or to the depths of the ocean allowing them to explore and experience the content more deeply. Other students visualize data by creating models or perform tasks by coding robots. Still others practice fundamental skills through dance and activity using interactive floors. Archdiocese of Louisville students are actively engaged in authentic learning that integrates state-of-the-art technology with the best practices in teaching.

 

Elementary School Technology

Our elementary school students use Chromebooks, tablets, laptops, interactive whiteboards, and tablet computers, daily. Brands and types of technology vary from school to school. Philosophically, however, all schools in the Archdiocese of Louisville agree that using technology increases student learning. Many schools have one-to-one programs in certain grades, with the hope of expanding to more grades as finances allow. Some schools have moved to a paperless classroom environment where all assignments are submitted electronically. Google Drive allows students to produce collaborative work such as presentations or to develop class polls.


High School Technology 

Technology permeates the high school environment in all Archdiocese of Louisville schools. All of our secondary schools are moving towards, or have accomplished, a one-to-one environment with equipment provided by the school or with equipment brought from home (BYOD) by the students. In these 1:1 environments students have the advantage of ubiquitous access to information in Learning Management Systems as well as on the World Wide Web. Students are positioned to manage data, prove hypotheses, and solve problems with the added advantage of being able to wirelessly share their work with their classmates to demonstrate their thinking. Interactive technologies allow students to take notes and physically manipulate, arrange, and rearrange objects for presentations and discussions. Teachers use the wireless devices to gather student responses to get immediate feedback from students regarding class information. Students utilize one-to-one world language systems as well as design and produce objects using 3D printers. Robots are a key component in programming classes as students learn to analyze problems and solve them using programming.